Inside Wall Street’s War Against the Fiduciary Rule | Money

For years, many brokers have been allowed to push expensive or risky investments, even if there were cheaper alternatives, under what was known as the “suitability standard”: Investment recommendations needed only be “roughly suitable” for the client. In practice, that means if your advisor is weighing two similar investments, and one pays out a greater commission, he or she can put you in that one—even if the alternative would trim your fees and increase your overall returns.

The White House’s Council of Economic Advisers found this conflicted advice costs Americans around $17 billion a year. Put another way: If you’re a 45-year-old with $100,000 in retirement savings, you could lose $37,000 through these conflicts alone by the time you retire at 65, the Council found.

By last year, the U.S. government looked poised to start changing that. After an eight-year effort, the Department of Labor—which oversees retirement savings—developed a rule that would require any financial advisor managing a retirement account to put you in the best investments available. It’s arguably the biggest change in retirement savings law since the benchmark Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974.

That “fiduciary rule”—so named because it required retirement advisors to act as fiduciaries, in their clients’ best interests—was set to roll out in April. But under President Donald Trump’s administration, the fate of the new rule is now in serious doubt. On Friday, President Trump issued an executive order that directs the Labor Department to reassess the entire initiative. That is probably welcome news to Wall Street, which has waged a never-ending war around the fiduciary standard on legislative, judicial and public opinion fronts.

Source: Inside Wall Street’s War Against the Fiduciary Rule | Money

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