Big Investors Want Directors to Stop Sitting On So Many Boards – WSJ

Here’s some progress. Overboarding used to mean at least seven or eight boards, and we often pointed to Frank Carlucci, who served on 20 and averaged a board meeting a day.


Giant money managers voted against the re-election of Ronald Havner, Jr. in May to the board of a real-estate company. Their reason: He runs a different company and sits on two other boards.After about 56% of voting shares were cast against Mr. Havner remaining an AvalonBay Communities Inc. director, he said he would resign, an offer rejected by the rest of the AvalonBay board. BlackRock Inc. and State Street Corp.’s money-management unit were among the large investors that voted against his re-election.

Mr. Havner, who is chief executive of Public Storage , also decided not to stand for re-election at California Resources Corp.’s 2018 annual meeting “due to concerns raised by investors relating to the time commitment required” for those roles, the company said in a regulatory filing.Mr. Havner “has taken steps to reduce the number of boards upon which he serves,” said a lawyer for Public Storage and PS Business Parks Inc., a related company.

Major institutional investors, governance advisers and boards themselves are cracking down on so-called overboarding, trying to ensure that directors don’t spread themselves too thin. Overstretched directors lack time to adequately monitor management, these critics contend.

Source: Big Investors Want Directors to Stop Sitting On So Many Boards – WSJ

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