What do companies really have to reveal when a CEO is ousted? – The Washington Post

Jena McGregor writes in the Washington Post about the delicate obfuscation in CEO departure announcements:<P Barnes & Noble’s announcement on Tuesday that its CEO, Demos Parneros, was being terminated, gave investors some important information: He would not get a severance. His firing was not related to “any potential fraud.” He had violated a company policy and…

FCA fines Barclays boss £640k over whistleblower failings – Citywire

The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) and Prudential Relegation Authority (PRA) have fined the chief executive of Barclays £642,430 over his handling of a whistle blower. In a joint statement the two regulators announced the Barclays chief James Staley will be fined for his failure to ‘act with due skill, care and diligence in the way he…

The Lonely CEO | Directors and Boards

The significant conclusion we would draw is somewhat different: CEOs do not allow or enable boards to play a significant substantive role beyond compliance and window dressing, and boards make no effort to change that. Whether it’s racial tensions in a coffee shop or testimony before Congress about privacy, CEOs face a lot of pressure…

It’s a dangerous time to be a bad CEO – The Washington Post

In its annual report, released Tuesday, the Conference Board found that among Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index companies that were in the bottom group of performers — as ranked by their total shareholder return — the CEO succession rate jumped five percentage points, from 12.2 percent in 2015 to 17.1 percent in 2016. That’s well above…

PwC’s Strategy&: CEOs Increasingly Fired for Ethical Violations

VEA Vice Chair Nell Minow writes in Huffington Post: PwC’s Strategy& released its annual CEO Success Study on Sunday, May 14, 2017. This year’s study explores the rise in the number of CEOs at the world’s 2,500 largest companies who were dismissed from their posts due to ethical lapses. As companies like FOX, United, Wells…

Why C.E.O.s Are Getting Fired More – The New Yorker

James Surowiecki writes in the New Yorker: Business professors once talked about “the imperial C.E.O.,” but, increasingly, we’re in the era of what Marcel Kahan, a law professor at N.Y.U., calls “the embattled C.E.O.” He told me, “Big shareholders and boards of directors have more power, and are more willing to use it. And C.E.O.s…